Git Pull: How It Works With Detailed Examples

The explanation is simple, though: When you send a pull request, you’re asking for the project’s maintainer to pull commits from your branch and merge them into their repository. After running the commands above, you can go back to your browser, go to the repo’s front page, and you should see your three commits: Now […]

The explanation is simple, though: When you send a pull request, you’re asking for the project’s maintainer to pull commits from your branch and merge them into their repository. After running the commands above, you can go back to your browser, go to the repo’s front page, and you should see your three commits: Now let’s simulate another user collaborating to the same remote. Git commits are identified by a unique-ish identifier, which is calculated based on their data, including the name and email of the author, time stamp, commit message and the commit’s parents.
Source: CloudBees